The Queen's Green Canopy

Dalkeith Country Park’s Old Oak Wood has been chosen as one of 70 Ancient Woodlands and 70 Ancient Trees that are dedicated to Her Majesty in celebration of the Platinum Jubilee.

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The Queen's Green Canopy

What is The Queen's Green Canopy?

His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales recently unveiled a network of 70 Ancient Woodlands and 70 Ancient Trees that are dedicated to Her Majesty in celebration of the Platinum Jubilee. We are thrilled that the Old Oak Wood (Purple Trail) has been included as part of this truly special network, The Queen’s Green Canopy. The Old Oak Wood has stood for hundreds of years within Dalkeith Country Park and has many stories to tell.

Each location chosen reflects a range of themes from conservation to history, children, education, literature/creative arts, science, communities, health and wellbeing. Each tree has its own story to tell. By sharing these stories, the aim is to raise awareness of these treasured habitats and the importance of conserving them for future generations.

What makes the Old Oak Wood special?

Let us introduce you three of The Park’s stand out trees from the Old Oak Wood, that are lovingly referred to as – The Mother Tree, The Micheal & The Ladies Seat. If only their branches could talk, they would have a lot to say…

The Mother Tree

The Mother Tree

The Park team collect and re-plant seedlings from The Mother Tree throughout the Old Oak Wood to keep the communities of trees intact. This process helps to maintain the network of connections in The Old Oak Wood. Connected forests are better able to cope with climate change and be productive, healthy and diverse and around for many generations to come.

The Micheal

The Micheal

This ancient tree is probably the oldest of our SSSI tree’s at around 900 years old. It was planted by the Benedictine monks when they came to Dalkeith from Melrose in 1150. Find out more about The Old Oak Woods SSSI status here.

The Ladies Seat

The Ladies Seat

This is where the ladies who lived in or frequented The Park would head to enjoy a sheltered picnic spot. These mighty oaks provided shelter no matter where they sat. It was also a top Roe Deer viewing spot where they can still be spotted today.

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